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from nbc's ayman mohyeldin in cairo. >> reporter: a day of mourning across egypt, in cairo, thousands paid respects to a protester killed by police. and in alexandria, a funeral for the member of the muslim brotherhood, just fifteen years old. both were victims of the riots that broke out after president morsy gave himself sweeping new powers. it ignited a wave of protests among them, and loyal supporters fighting in the streets. the muslim brotherhood were to blame, we elected them, thought they would lift us up, but they threw us to the ground. i will never vote for them again in my life, this woman says, many believe that morsy over-reached, and he moved quickly to oversee the damage, meeting tonight with egypt's judicial council, claiming tonight he would limit the scope of his powers. morsy supporters say he had to act to reign in egypt's powerful judges. >> every time we approached the shore of the transition, somebody would sink the boat. that somebody, thus far has been the court of egypt, and hosni mubarak led and politically managed courts. >> reporter: egypt's judges have b
in afghanistan under investigation after new revelations in the cia sex scandal. >> in cairo, eu foreign ministers and members of the arab league discuss the syrian crisis. the lenders in charge of patching up the eurozone have gone head to head in a very public disagreement on the best way to deal with grease. >> at a meeting in brussels, the head of the imf and -- the heads of the imf and eurozone clashed over when greece should reduce its debt. >> but they did at least agree on a few things -- above all the grece could have at least two years to cut deficit. >> it is a question of how much progress greece can realistically be expected to make in a particular amount of time. >> greece's international lenders were playing down their differences the morning after the clash over athens' debts. the imf wants greece to achieve its lower ratio by 2020 while the eu foreign ministers want to allow the country two more years. >> there's no disagreement between the imf and the euro group, but the way forward is difficult. even if we agree on a target date, we have to figure out how to get there.
indeed. kevin connolly in cairo. the spokes person for the israeli defense force joins us live from tel aviv. thanks for being with us. what's your reaction to the fact more rockets appeared to have been fired at tel aviv? it shows the palestinian militants in gaza have longer- range rockets. >> of far, they have not managed to really target tel aviv according to my initial investigation. rockets did not hit the ground in tel aviv as of yet. we were aware they have these capabilities. this is why we targeted their the groundd -- on th fire fight. they have a rocket destined to read tel aviv. >> how long will the military offensive in gaza continue? reservists have been drafted in. is that the precursor to a ground operation? >> the operation will continue as long as we reach our goal. the main goal of the operation is to defend nearly 3 million israelis currently under this immediate rocket danger from gaza launched by hamas and other terrorist organizations. this is what all options are still on the table, including a ground operation. we are currently assessing our next steps and wil
of 1940 the and journeys of grandeur to write in the streets of cairo to make a plea for cairo. they drove the i talions pretty far west into libya to bailout mazzoleni although they were not happy about that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again advanced by the british into libya in hopes of driving back the forces he turned around and pushed the british back again and all the way this time sort of disastrously all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so, when the american soldiers arrived, the allies i should say and the axis forces were dug in and testing each other in a place which was about 60 miles west of alexandria close enough to alexandria which was the british naval center in egypt close enough to cairo to be really extremely dangerous and i think frightening to all the allies on the suez canal or the middle eastern oil fie
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
visions of grandeur, he wanted to ride his streets down the roads of cairo and he decided to attack the british doing it. the british attacked back and drove the italians pretty far west into libya, at which point hitler realized that he really needed to bail out, although don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in or when ronald, along with a bunch of others and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolled around, things will quiet down and it was terribly hot. the campaigning with its glory would stop. they would advance then into libya in hopes of driving the forces back. ronald turned around and press the british back again. all the latest time, sort of disastrously, into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so when the american soldiers arrived, the british allies and the axis forces -- the idea in testing each other, which was about 60 miles west of alexandria, close enough to alexandria, which was the british naval center in egypt, close enough to cairo, to be very dangerous and i think extremely frightening to all of the allies
dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don't quite know what to do. some people are trying to mount a legal challenge to his new powers. given the fact that he's now made himself immune to the courts, that may be useless. terrell? >> is this likely to be resolved in negotiations or could we see this turn into a long, drawn-out affair with protests similar to what we saw during the ouster of former president hosni mubarak? >> reporter: many people here still support president morsi but three of his senior advisers have resigned and yesterday the
down the street of cairo. he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east, the british attacked right back, and drove the italians pretty far west in to libya, at which point hitler realized he needed to power. i don't think he was happy about it. he sent inner win, the famous take commander along with a bunch of [inaudible] and he effectively drove the british back in to egypt. the campaigning would seize and the two sides would give inspect in the fall of 1941, there was advance by the british in to libya in hopes of driving the access forces back. rommel turned around and pushed the british back again, and all the way this time, sort of disastersously deep in to egypt deeper than ever been. when the american soldiers arrived, the british the allies, i should say and the access forces were dug in testing each other in a place called the al main line. which was 60 miles west of al sand rei ya which was the british navel center in egypt. close enough to cairo and the suez canal, to be really extremely dangerous and frightening to all the allies. beyond the
of demonstrators are still in cairo's tahrir square, venting opposition to morsi's move, granting himself sweeping new powers. that triggered days of violent protests throughout the country. some critics claim morsi, who is egypt's first freely elected president is trying to establish a dictatorship. morsi is meeting today with the country's highest judicial authority in a bid to defuse this crisis. reza sayah is live in cairo. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: john, let's bring you up to speed. as we speak, egyptian president mohamed morsi meeting with egypt's top judges, seven of them representing the supreme judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses h
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
, wanted to ride his white stallion down the streets of cairo. he had trooped in libya when was an italian colony, and he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east. the british attacked right back and went, drove the italians pretty far west into libya at which point hitler realized he really needed to bail out his pal, mussolini, although i don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in irwin rommel, the famous tank commander, along with a bunch of perhapsers, and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolls around, things would kind of quiet down. it was terribly hot, and the campaigning would sort of cease, the two sides would dig in, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again an advance by the british into libya in hopes of driving the axis forces back. rommel turned around and pushed the british back again all the way this time, sort of disastrously, all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they'd ever been before. so when the american soldiers arrived, the british, the allies, i should say, and the axis forces were kind of dug
is in cairo tonight. >> attempts by egypt president morsi to expand his powers have galvanized the oppositio opposition. in to the largest street protest since those that helped overthrow the former president hosni mubarak two years ago. >> the protesters are a mix. young and old. secular and nationalists. joined for the moment by one emotion. anger. the egypt's first democratically elected president overstepped the bounds and trying to become exactly what they fought so hard to get rid of. a dictator. >> they are great control. appreciate the culture in their own image of muslim brothers. they are not hiding it. it's not that. they are doing it, secretly. >> mohammed morsi's attempt at compromise meeting with the chief judges in cairo, giving verbal assurances that the sweeping powers would only be temporary and limited to unspecified sovereign matters has done nothing to stem unrest. schools and many businesses were closed today due to demonstrations. planned march by muslim brotherhood in support of mohammed morsi was canceled to reduce the chance of conflict between the two sides. >> opp
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
. in cairo's tahrir square, thousands are chanting for regime change. they say egypt's new president is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of
has more from cairo. >> yeg, some dramatic developments here in cairo. egypt's president trying to expand his own powers dramatically, saying that any of his presidential decrees issued since he took office six months ago cannot be overturned by anybody, including the courts. and that those previous officials who could be implicated in murdering demonstrators during the revolution a year ago would be retried. as one morsey opponent put it, he is basically putting himself above the having no one to check his powers. we have seen street protests. those protests could grow dramatically with these new announcements by the egyptian president. it comes on the heels of a real diplomatic success in the world spotlight here. president morsey helping to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas. really, making the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its own rule here could be put to the test almost immediately. with new decrees expanding his power,
groups are planning competing rallies in cairo at locations less than a mild apart. it could set the stage for more violence. >> back at home, enjoy the nice weather. change is coming for the workweek, les birth? >>> it has been a pleasant holiday weekend weatherwise. we will see clouds rolling in and patchy fog. coast bay and inland, the temperatures will stay in the 40s, low to upper 40s along the coast and bay. by tomorrow, we will see highs in the 60s, once again, low to upper 60s in some of the inland spots and plenty of sunshine. the temperatures maybe a couple of degrees cooler than what we saw today. it is going to stay dry. if you have travel plans tomorrow, it looks like high pressure is staying in effect. that is a look at our sat height radar. like id we got big changes heading our way. middle of the workweek. time it out with future cast. tuesday, it will be our transitional day, a few clouds roll in. then, in the overnight hours, tuesday, into wednesday morning, just in time for thed with morning commute you can see rain, moderate rain,a made, a cross the bay area -
of the u.s. embassy in cairo is now closed. this after violent clashes cutting off access to the u.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we
. the arab league is convening in cairo to discuss the situation in gaza. this desk will be live all throughout the morning and afternoon to bring you the latest information, so when we have breaking news, we'll toss it back up to you. >> we appreciate that, nick. thank you. and let's take you back to the israeli side of the border. israeli tanks and troops certainly taking up positions there, trying to get us back to fred. what are you seeing there in terms of military activity? >> reporter: hi, randi. there's a lot of military activity on this side of the border. on the one hand, you have the air strikes that the israeli air force is conducting there over gaza. sara was talking about it just a little bit. as she was talking, there was actually a bomb being dropped on gaza that we could see here from our position. i'd say we're about four, maybe five kilometers away from the gaza border, but we do see it right behind us. we also saw those rockets that sara was talking about that were being fired out of gaza. those were actually fired in the direction of where we are right now. some
@cnbc.com. >>> back to the middle east. ban ki-moon has called for an immediate cease fire in gaza. speaking in cairo, he's warned that any israeli ground operation must be avoided. the country has decided to hold off on planneds for a ground invasion. oil prices currently trading slightly lower. brent crude sitting close to a one month high at the moment. joining us for how is head of commodity market strategy. we'll get to harry in a few moments. he's miking up. meanwhile, china firmly on track. this doesn't mean in-flows to the mainland is expanding. latest data showed another contraction extending the longest run in falls of three years as corporates continue to cut back on spending because of global growth uncertainties. china drew in $913797 billion in fdi money between january to march, down 3.45% compared to last year's figures. harry is now good. let's kick off with previously renewed tensions and violence in the gaza strip hasn't fed in. >> i think the latest events add an additional layer to pre-existing geopolitical tensions. but the current geography of the events over the past couple da
at these pictures. cairo, egypt. thousands of people chanting. morsi, the president of that country, recently the stowed absolute powers among himself. about 60,000 people in the square. numbers reportedly growing. those pictures speaking for themselves. connell: day five out of those protests. right now, let's make you a little money. charles payne. dagen: what do you got? charles: i am driving down 151st street, a gigantic line of people all the way down the block. they were at the house of hoops. this is the most amazing sneaker store you have ever seen in your life. it turns out, footlocker owns it. this morning, goldman sachs put a pot on footlocker. i just wanted to reiterate it, they also have a woman's sneaker store. connell: whatever the newest sneaker was, i think it faded for a while, but now it is back. charles: my son is not into sports, but he knows these sneakers. when the new ones come out, he will let me know. just five minutes ago they were sold out on ebay. first of all, i am not going to get you these sneakers, your grades are not good enough and they cost too much. i do n
that are the cease fire talks going on inside cairo and obviously secretary of state hillary clinton's visit here over the next 24 to 36 hours may delay a ground invasion. the question is, is it enough to actually get a cease fire deal on the table and signed between hamas jihad, and israel here on the other side. guys? >> steve: a lot of moving parts. what do you know about apparently earlier today an employee at the u.s. embassy in tel aviv was apparently stabbed by somebody. what's up with that? >> exactly. what it appears to be is that a local jewish man here, an israeli was upset h a personal beef with someone who was a local employee of the embassy and as though you would go to any workplace and try to take out your anger there at the person who happened to be working there, that's what happened. it seems unrelated to anything having to do with the united states. the embassy a coincidence that the man was so angry with was a guard there. thankfully fort guard, there were other people who subdued the attacker. but totally unrelated to things going on here or for that matter, the u.s. embassy
the in the new president backs down. jim is watching it for us in cairo. good evening. >> reporter: today six aids of president morsi resigned. the latest sign of what some are calling his power grab is giving his inner circle some serious second thoughts. day four of the crisis and it's starting to look like revolution again. now filled with dozens of tents and protesters who refuse to leave until president morsi backs down or resigns. they clash again with rioters who were caught brutally beating and dragging away several protesters. casualties are mounting on both sides as anger against morsi gr grows. >> translator: everything is still the same. we have replaced a corrupt regime with another brutal rejust a minute. >> reporter: the latest turmoil begain thursday when morsi decreed sweeping powers for himself claiming that would speed up toward a new constitution and democracy. >> we tried to take care of the countries that try to secure stability for this country. >> reporter: only his islamist supporters were buying it. >> we want a new president. >> reporter: many judges and journalists
's president mohamed morsi. they clashed in the square in cairo yesterday. a teenager was killed and 40 people hurt. morsi who, of course, brokered the mideast cease-fire last week is now under protest to take steps to give himself more absolute powers to run the country. >>> back here at home, top republican lawmakers now say they'd be willing to break a no tax pledge to avoid the fiscal cliff. georgia senator saxby chambliss was among those on the sunday talk shows who said he'd be willing to reconsider raising taxes if democrats will cut spending. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if the democrats agree to reform. >> the pledge signed 18 years ago is for that congress. the world has changed and the economic situation is different. >> now, congressional staffers met over the holiday weekend. and leaders intend to meet with the president this week. there are predictions it could be wrapped up before christmas. >> i like that optimism. >>> well, president obama is expected to announce this week a major reshuffling of his cabinet. u.n. ambassador s
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us. steve, what's it looking like over there? >> it's looking pretty good. i haven't even started my holiday season shopping. i'll leave that right till the last moment. what is really fascinating is every single surve
that film that scurrilous film was made and attacks on the embassy in cairo and he was not quick to condemn the attacks and president obama let him know that the alliance was actually in question over that. but they seem to have gotten along very well over the efforts to combined effort to end the gaza conflict and we're on the phone a lot and both sides say, you know, achieved some sort of rappaport. >> thank you very much. >>> and just in, we're getting word the army private accused of leaking secrets to wick leaks is right now on the stand testifying in his defense. that's next. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ and the next great idea could be yours. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd sympto
protest in cairo, top association of judges want every judge to walk off the job. they are angry because of a decree giving mohamed morsi unchecked power. they call the decree an unprecedented attack. >>> an irish newspaper editor resigned after publishing topless photographs of kate. kate is sun bathing with prince william on vacation in a private home. a french magazine first published the photos. >>> a shootout in alabama left a deputy sheriff dead and another in critical condition. deputy scott ward was killed yesterday when the deputies responded to a family dispute in a mobile home. the gunman was also killed during that confrontation. >>> superstorm sandy has cost new jersey more than $29 billion in damage and that number could easily rise. governor chris christie's office said the final total will only be known taking into account next summer's tourism season. governor cuomo will ask the federal government for $30 billion to help with his state's recovery. >>> investigators in the west bank are getting ready to open the tomb of yasser arafat. it will be exhumed on tuesday. it wil
. >>> and in national newers protestors in cairo threw rocks at riot police who in response fired back with tears. >> the protestors are angry about a decree by mohammed morsi that bars judicial review of his decisions. critiques are calling the president the same word sometimes used to describe the former president mubarak. >>> china has a fighter jet landing on its first ever new aircraft carrier. the j-15 yet successfully landed on the deck of the carrier when ened services in september. it was rebrought in from a ship bought from the ukraine. the carrier will raise the overall strength of the chinese navy. >>> yacht caught fire off the coast of miami beach there. you can see it on the video. it started on the 80-foot vessel about 15-miles away from shore. there were three people on the boat, jumped into the water and rescued from the coastguard. the yacht named bliss is partially submerge this had morning. they are working on salvaging it and no injuries were reported. >>> the editor who accomplished kate middleton's photos was suspected after the pictures were released back in september. y
in cairo after mohammed morsi taking total control of the country and won't answer to the branch of government. they are afraid the latest power grab will lead egypt away from democracy and back into a dictatorship and possibly all of the way to shirea law. >> nonislamist egyptian activist mohammed el baradei is calling on the united states to condemn morsi. i am hoping to see a strong statement of condemnation by the u.s., by europe and everybody who really cares about human dignity. democrat and chairman of the senate committee of armed services carl levin says america needs to play the middle. >> i think we have to be cautious. we doesn't want to see a democratically elected auto krat take the place of an unelected dictator which is the case before that. on the other hand there are real pluses here. >> they will push the white house to take a side. they need to condemn morsi and condemn him now. >> this is not what taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward democracy which he promised the people of egypt when your party was elected preside
and the pro democracy demonstrators led to one death and hundred credits of injuries. and now to cairo, what happened with the meeting with the judges today with president morsi? >>reporter: details still coming out but this was supposed to be a dave compromise when the egyptian president reached out to opponents, some of the chief judge whose have opposed his move to put himself above the law and the courts and make a compromise on that decree, perhaps modify it. initial reports say there was no back down by the president, insteads saying he stands firm on his right to impose that decree and any laws he issues are final and above the law. really, you can hear it filter into the crowd. they are getting news of this and the anger and energy of the crowd has risen in the past hour. >>shepard: and they will not back down unless and until president morsi rescinds the decrees. >>reporter: that is right. they are looking for complete withdrawal of the decree by the president. there is a major demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. in was supposed to be competing demonstrations, with backers of the
in cairo. hillary clinton will be arriving later this evening to have negotiations with her israeli counterparts as well as palestinian officials. she will also be heading to cairo to meet with morsi who is meeting with the u.n. secretary general and so every is hoping truth does stick. officials have been hinting there could be one in the next several hours. but on the ground, they are bracing for a possible ground invasion with thousands of soldiers on the border. back to you. >> stay with us over there. we'll be watching hopefully it doesn't happen, but a possibility. we appreciate your report. the nbc team over there, rich article ard engel, he must live in the area because he's always where needs to be. always things exploding around. >> when we come back, we'll talk more about the stories that are likely to drive today's trading, including the crisis in the middle east. we've also got earnings coming up and a speech from ben bernanke. we'll be talking about the looming fiscal cliff. we'll put them all into perspective. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. y
is up $1 as the secretary of state has arrived in cairo. a big day full of planes, trains and automobiles with tens of millions of americans set to embark on their holiday weekend journeys. our phil lebeau is in chicago with more on the holiday travel landscape. how painful is it going to be? >> you know, carl f you're traveling, you always need a little more patience thanksgiving weekend. for the airlines, they're keeping their fingers crossed because if you look at a map of the united states, you really don't see any major storm systems. that means if it's a smooth weekend, you talked about this being important to the profitability of fourth quarter, that's certainly good news for the airlines. take a look at the number of people who will be traveling this thanksgiving weekend. just under 44 million people. that's a slight increase from last year. the average amount they're spending, that's down 10%. less than $500. why? in large part it's because fewer people are flying. they're not spending as much for the airfare that might cost them $400, $500, maybe $600 if they're
. next week a court in cairo will attempt to decide whether it is even a constitutional move. reza sayah is live for us in cairo. before we talk about how he's justifying the powers, you're getting new information on a huge move from the muslim brotherhood. reza, are you with me? we're going to work on getting -- >> reporter: brooke, the muslim brotherhood has canceled their 1 million man demonstration. of course it could energize the opposition factions behind us with their 1 million man demonstration, but there is absolutely no indication at this point that the muslim brotherhood is losing support. remember, this is a powerful organization, one of the most powerful organizations in the political landscape, in egypt, and at this point, i think many people will look at this at face value, someone sensible in the muslim brotherhood made the decision they have competing demonstrations tomorrow that could be the potential for violence. several days have passed since the decrees and the outcome hasn't been pleasant. was this just a bad miscalculation by the president? >> not at all. it is a
protesters spent another day on the streets of cairo, calling their president the new pharaoh. fearful of another dictatorship. at least one demonstrator was killed today. the opposition says he died after inhaling excessive amounts of tear gas. tahrir square now look at this, a tent city. demonstrators say this is where they will remain until president mohamed morsi backs away from his controversial decree, which says no person, no authority can overrule his decisions until a new constitution is put in place. >>> tissue samples from yasser arafat's body are in the hands of forensic experts. his grave was opened today in ramallah. samples were taken from his remains. the exact cause of the former palestinian leader's death has long been a mystery. now testing will be done to find out if arafat was in fact poisons. >> the indications we have or the convictions we have that israel have done this assassination but yet we still need evidence. >> israel meantime denied those allegations. >>> a fiery scene in downtown sydney, australia, today. look at this with me and you'll see a cab, look
in cairo that is packed with protestors, of course. he's trying to take on near absolute power, allowing him to legislate by decree. basically very little court oversight. he tried to walk some back, but it remains very contentious and one of the big puzzles for foreign policy at the white house. we're taking rise above on the road. are the elected representatives responsible for reaching aa deal on the fiscal cliff really speaking for their constituents? john harwood kicks it off with a visit to speaker boehner's home state of ohio. good morning. >> good morning, carl. here in the capital the fiscal cliff is an abstract policy debate, but in john boehner's district a tip into the recession would cause real economic pain. they've been working back economically from the long-term loss of manufacturing jobs and troubles in the auto industry. the last thing this area needs now is another economic setback from the fiscal cliff. house speaker boehner and hez colleagues in the congressional leadership have sounded con sill to her notes about their prospects. that sounds like good news in middl
in egypt. here in cairo, protesters are angry with president morsi, throwing stones at police. the police firing back with tear gas. yesterday in a town one person was killed when an angry crowd attacked the local office of the muslim brotherhood. that is the islamist group in which the president draws so much of his support. here in sigh roe, on the square the birthplace of the egyptian revolution last year people protested, are camped out, and say they won't leave until president morsi agrees to assume the decree that has given him these sweeping new powers. >> any sign president morsi is willing to compromise? >> reporter: well many egyptians still support president morsi, but three of his senior advisers resigned and yesterday the egyptian stock market plunged by nearly 10%, perhaps the reason president morsi is sounding much more conciliatory, meeting today with a group of very senior judges and reiterated these measures are supposed to be temporary. he's promised he will relinquish them next year when egypt gets a new constitution and a new parliament, but the p
is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty for killing protesters in masters revolution, they would be retried. president mohammed morsi on the heel
the compound in central cairo. the protesters, they are actually not targeting the embassy. they have been demonstrating, however, for a week. there has been some fighting with riot police around tahrir square. they've got rocks, tear gas being hurled in the streets. demonstrators, they are trying to force president mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft of egypt's all-important new constitution. this is going to be the backbone, the centerpiece of egypt's dem
undercity published by random house. and robert a cairo. "passage of power." and the late anthony. "house of stone" a memoir of home, family, and middle east published by mid land park. the weapon -- winner of the 2012 national book award for non-fiction describes a world that couldn't be any more difficult from the world that we're enjoying here tonight. yesterday it's a world that our world depends entirely upon. the subject of this book have been patronized and are manhattan sized, and eagerly egg neared in previous work. in this book, they appear in all of their complexity. the villain and sometimes villains along with the types heroes. the -- behind the bock reminds us all that good listening is an ethical act. stylistically, this book pretty much invents a new genre of non-fiction writing because the author rivals the great novelists in developing characters and plotting various narratives that intersect, and setting up surprises and creating tension. the winner of the 2012 non-fiction national book award is katherine. "behind the beautiful forever, life, death, and hope in mum boy
to those very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they told us they are nearing an agreement, that that agreement might actually take place within the next few hours. he said that the cease fire will be implemented in two parts but he didn't get any details to exactly what the cease fire will look like and as to which of hamas' demands, if any, that the israelis will agree to. >> that's very significant. i know clarissa you had a chance to question the leader of hamas yesterday. let's play that tape. >> cbs news in america, please. does hamas want peace with israel? >> reporter: god willing the american people will wake up he said and realize it's better to stand with 350 million americans than continue to support israel. >> quite an answer clarissa. i have to ask you, what was it like being a female american journalist in that room and what about his response? >> reporter: well it was certainly intimidating norah. i was the only american in the room and, as you can see, had to shout to be heard. his aides pointed at me and said you are a hunter. so i would t
is that in fact, this began as a spontaneous, not a premeditated response to what transpired in cairo. >> reporter: they have vowed a fight, with her erroneous remarks blaming the attack on the benghazi compound on a demonstration over that anti-muslim video run amok. president obama suggests if they want a fight, they will get one. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they've got a problem with me. >> reporter: to replace secretary geithner at treasury, white house chief of staff jack lew is thought to have the edge. the president likes him for his economic expertise and easy going manner. he's competing with current treasury officials, but there's also talk of a business ceo type. such as facebook's cheryl sandberg. and michelle flournoy would be the first woman secretary of defense but kerry may have the edge. >> the new strategy is to bore our enemies to death. >> reporter: and george, a possible political drawback for picking senator kerry is it opens up the seat once thought to be reliably democrat. but the senator says that's no
. in egypt, tens of thousands have taken to the streets of cairo last night to protest against the decree by the egyptian president mohamed morsi that grants him sweeping constitutional powers. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of egyptians have poured into tahrir square and cities all across egypt demanding that president mohamed morsi rescind his decision that granted him sweeping powers. they say it is reminiscent of the mubarak era, sending this country back to dictatorship. for the past five days, police have clashed with protesters, firing tear gas and beating them at times. more importantly, they are demanding that egypt's new constitution is one that reflects the diversity of egypt, not the sole control of the muslim brotherhood. many of the people here are angered by what they say is the attempt by the muslim brotherhood and the president mohamed morsi to take control of the country and ram pole their agenda at the expense of secular forces like those that have gathered behind my. >> neil sheering still with us. investors have gotten quite bullish on egypt. do you think the inve
, very long time. we have had since 1979 the pteron -- tehran model, and now you have in cairo that has hybrid model. i share your insights in governments and how is -- share your insights in governments and how that is going to play out? >> i think we have to be aware there is a trend in place here that to me is problematic. and that is between 1970 and now, the trend was toward state stabilization. even though it was a false promise of stability under authoritarian. in lebanon, it has been the other way for some time. in iraq, sure. libya, syria. the question becomes, can you have effective governance without a state? this is a hugely important problem. the kingdom's do not face it yet. or may not. i do not know. egypt, tunisia. this is one element of effective governance. you need a cohesive, coherent states. marwan? >> i think it was an extremely important question. i think social networks of grown with almost every government in the region. the state provides favors to players, a small or big. it is not a productive form of, you know, production. it is not merit-based. it is loyalt
the president's power graham grab there. nbc eayman mohyeldin is in cairo with the latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, matt. a few days ago president morrisey of egypt was receiving praise from around the world including u.s. president barack obama for brokering that cease-fire and today he's coming under criticism that puts him in conflict with the top judges that. political fight is spilling over into the streets, claiming lives and plunging the country's economy into turmoil, and more importantly it is threatening the country's post-revolutionary progress. for a fourth straight night protest efforts attacked the offices of president mohamed morsi's freedom and justice party. the political wing of the muslim brotherhood. demonstrators are angry at president morsmorsi's latest decision, one that's reverting the country to a dictatorship. >> we want a contry of institutions, not symbolized in one person who makes all decisions and nobody can say no. >> reporter: morsi's decree gave him legislative powers and extended the time to write a new constitution by two months
who is taking pictures of some of zandt in cairo. -- some event in cairo. you knew it was and of effective look. -- an objective look. i do not know who is taking the pictures. they may be working for some small network because the network does not want to bring in its own cameraman. >> notice if you watch more than one newscast, notice the number of times you will see precisely the same video when it comes from overseas in large part because the networks do not have their own reporters, and they have brought it from the same source. . no. 2, what is wrong with having a local reporter covering the event? a local reporter speaks the language and knows the people. let's say the local reporter is reported from tehran and the local reporter knows if he or she makes a misstep, they are going to be arrested and thrown in jail. the american reporter may get thrown out of the country, but that is probably the worst that is going to happen. i find there is no willingness to believe objectivity in journalism is possible. i keep hearing there is no such thing as absolute objec
was in fact initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. >> reporter: tuesday rice acknowledged there was no protest in benghazi, but she blamed the cia, as she did last week. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >> reporter: acting cia director mike morel accompanied rice tuesday, in effect her wing man, but it didn't help. >> i'm more troubled today knowing, having met with the acting director of the cia and ambassador rice. >> reporter: both senator kelly ayotte and senator lindsey graham threatened to block rice's nomination. rice did persuade one senator. >> she said what she believed was true, and she was under no political influence from the white house. >> reporter: but joe lieberman is quitting the senate and won't have a vote rice and president obama are closer than he and the iconic hillary clinton. the president has made it clear he will fight for rice and tuesday the white house was not backing down. >> the focus on, some might sa
.s. ambassador has now extended to several dozen people. many of them with ties into egypt and cairo. what more do you know about that, sir? >> we do know that there are dozens of suspects. this threes right in the -- flies in the face of the administration told us that this was some mob and a video that got out of control. what is clear from the beginning it was terrorist attack that was coordinated. there were terrorist at it being activities in benghazi in months leading up to this. thanks to senator lindsey graham we're able to interview somebody there in tunisia. bill: you were just in tripoli. you did not come back with a favorable review. you have alleged that the administration is stonewalling. is that still the case now or has there been a little give-and-take on some information and questions you have? >> hopefully now we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did not. i sent the first letter over to secretary clinton on september 20th. they had the gal to print out pages on internet site and pretend they were somehow complying
on the streets of cairo. back to you. >> steve: all right. live in jerusalem with the very latest. thank you. >> gretchen: and now the rest of today's headlines for monday. thousands of workers protesting today demanding justice for a factory fire. this happened in bangladesh. 112 people died. crowds are block streets and throwing rocks at the burned out garment factory, many workers were trapped in the building because if you can believe this, there were no emergency exits for them. there are reports that some of the clothes being made there were for wal-mart, sears, and the clothing line of sean colmes. >>> in two hours, west virginia congresswoman shelly moore capito will announce her candidacy for senate. she was just elected to her 7th term in congress is a pro choice republican. she will run for democrat jay rockefeller's seat. the 75-year-old held that seat since 1984. >>> here is a question for you, should a mentally handicapped person be executed for committing murder? that's the question that will be debated in one courtroom this morning. for the next two weeks, lawyer also argue t
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